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Parenting Styles

Parenting Styles

Raising children can be a difficult task, and it can be even more difficult to find the right parenting style. There are so many parenting styles to choose from, it can be hard to know which one is right for you and your family. Some of the more popular parenting styles include helicopter parenting, tiger parenting, free-range parenting, and lawnmower parenting.

Each of these parenting styles has its own benefits and drawbacks. Helicopter parenting can help ensure that your children are safe and have everything they need, but it can also be stifling and cause your children to become dependent on you. Tiger parenting can help children achieve academic success, but it can also lead to stress and anxiety. Free-range parenting can help children learn independence and self-reliance, but it can also put them in danger. Lawnmower parenting clears all obstacles out of your child’s way, but it can also prevent them from learning how to cope with failure.

Helicopter Parenting

Helicopter parenting is a parenting style in which parents constantly micromanage every aspect of their children's lives. Helicopter parenting began to become popular in the 1990s, and it has since become one of the most common parenting styles. Helicopter parenting is characterized by parents being extremely involved in their children's lives, often to the point where the children are not allowed to make any decisions on their own. Helicopter parents typically hover over their children, constantly checking in on them and interfering with their lives. Helicopter parenting can be beneficial in some ways, as it can help ensure that children are safe and have everything they need. However, helicopter parenting can also be stifling and cause children to become dependent on their parents. Additionally, helicopter parenting can lead to stress and anxiety in children.

You Might Be a Helicopter Parent if…

  1. You don’t give them opportunities to make their own mistakes.
  2. You fight your child’s battles.
  3. You do their homework (or rewrite it after they’ve gone to bed).
  4. You shout advice to their coaches from the sidelines.
  5. You protect them from physical and mental risks (age appropriate ones).
  6. You constantly text your teenager to ‘check in’.
  7. You do their chores for them (cleaning their room, making their bed, doing their laundry).
  8. You answer any questions asked of your child by another adult.

Tiger Parenting

Tiger parenting is a parenting style that originated in Asia and has become popular in the United States in recent years. Tiger parenting is characterized by parents placing a high emphasis on academic achievement. Tiger parents push their children to excel in school and often require them to get straight A's. Tiger parenting can be beneficial in terms of improving academic achievement, but it can also lead to stress and anxiety in children. Additionally, tiger parenting can cause children to have a negative view of themselves and can make them feel like they are never good enough.

You Might Be a Tiger Parent if...

  1. Your tone is threatening when you speak with your child.
  2. You have rigid and strict rules.
  3. You withdraw warmth or love when the child makes a mistake.
  4. You order your child around.
  5. Your word is the law.
  6. Your child is all work and no play.
  7. You don’t show emotions, preferring a clinical attitude.
  8. You don’t allow your child to have their own opinions.

Free-Range parenting

Free-range parenting is a parenting style in which parents allow their children to roam free and explore the world on their own. Free-range parenting began to become popular in the 1990s, and it has since become one of the most common parenting styles. Free-range parenting is characterized by parents trusting their children to make decisions on their own and allowing them to explore the world without supervision. Free-range parenting can be beneficial in terms of teaching children independence and self-reliance. However, free-range parenting can also put children in danger if they are not supervised properly. Additionally, free-range parenting can lead to children getting into trouble if they are not given proper guidance.

You Might Be a Free-Range Parent if...

  1. You have to calm down other parents and say “they’re okay” when your child falls down.
  2. Your child will never have a mobile phone.
  3. You don’t flip out if your child is late home from school or playing with friends.
  4. When your children are fighting, you and your spouse make bets on which one will win.
  5. The mention of joining the school P&C makes you break out in hives.
  6. Your child is covered in bruises, but you have no idea where they came from, nor do you really care.
  7. Your child sees you making your lunch and tells you they are hungry, and your reply is to point to the fridge and say “Have at it.”
  8. You are cheering your child on the first time they climb a tree.

Lawnmower Parenting

Lawnmower parenting is a parenting style in which parents clear all obstacles out of their child's way. Lawnmower parenting began to become popular in the 1990s, and it has since become one of the most common parenting styles. Lawnmower parenting is characterized by parents doing everything for their children, often to the point where the children are not allowed to do anything on their own. Lawnmower parenting can be beneficial in terms of preventing children from having to face obstacles. However, lawnmower parenting can also prevent children from learning how to cope with failure. Additionally, lawnmower parenting can make it difficult for children to develop social skills.

You Might Be a Lawnmower Parent if...

  1. You step in a break up conflict before it happens.
  2. You hand select your child’s playdates.
  3. You drive home after dropping your child at school to collect their hat/lunchbox/science project because they forgot it and “It’s important Mum!”
  4. You are doing the networking necessary to get your young adult into a good school.
  5. You personally know your child’s bosses and call them regularly to ‘advocate’ on your child’s behalf.
  6. You remove your child from ‘hard’ activities.
  7. You give your child whatever they want.
  8. You make excuses for bad behaviour to minimise the consequences.

There are many other parenting styles, from attachment parenting to narcissistic parenting, affectionless control parenting, dolphin parenting, hybrid versions and many more along the spectrum of rigid parenting styles to ones that are more carefree. Google ‘parenting styles’ and you will fall down a rabbit hole of information (some good, and some not so good, so beware).

But, which parenting style is right for you? The answer to that question depends on your parenting goals and the needs of your children. Every parenting style has its own benefits, so it is important to find one that will work best for you and your family. You may favour one style, or change it up for different situations (or for different children, based on their needs). Ultimately, the most important thing is that you are raising healthy and happy children.

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